In-Class Writing and Revision Reservoir

This tab serves to do a few things: (a) provide a list of in-class writing prompts we’ve completed so far and (b) act as a reservoir for some of the revision questions you’ll want to ask yourself when revising and reviewing your blog posts.

In-class Writing

In case you missed an in-class writing prompt, forgot to post one to your blog, or need to keep track of things for your portfolio, here’s an ongoing list of in-class writing prompts we’ve done so far. Remember that these posts do count toward your participation grade!

1.) September 5th: How does writing work in your own fields of study? Using the terms we discussed from Naming What We Know—take five to ten minutes and write about how the writing you do in your program (lab reports, analyses, etc.) adheres to or doesn’t adhere to these ideas.

2.) September 19th: How does what you read today in Ralph Cintron’s Angels’ Townchange, alter, revise, and/or extend the rhetoric and literacy-based narratives about graffiti / street art / tagging we’ve been discussing in class so far?

3.) September 28th: Graffiti Wrap-Up Questions

  • What are the affordances of graffiti as a medium? That is to say, what can it do that other media can’t?

  • What’s the relationship (or a relationship) between graffiti and space (i.e., location)? How do we make sense of these things in relationship to each other?

  • What does exploring graffiti tell you about writing (composition), literacy, and rhetoric, writ-large? (It may be helpful to think back to the Bitzer and Adler-Kassner + Wardle readings)

  • How have your notions of graffiti, street art, and tagging changed since the introduction of this unit?

4.) October 17th: Casting back to Audio, Glitch, and File Formatting

  • Why did we talk about disruption, formatting, and glitch last week? What’s any of this have to do with WAM?
  • What do the two articles we read, in addition our databending workshop, tell us about audio as a medium?

5.) October 24th: Audio Wrap-Up

  • What are the affordances of sound as a mode? What does it do that other modes can’t?
  • What’s the relationship (or a relationship) between audio and space (i.e., location)? How do we make sense of these things in relationship to each other?
  • What does recording, editing, and/or recombining audio tell you about writing, literacy, and rhetoric, writ-large?
  • What suggestions do you have for improving or otherwise revising this unit? (Things you’d like to see, things you’d like to do, how better to support your work in Audacity or learning audio editing, etc.)

6.) November 2nd: Portfolio Feedback

  • General impressions—how did this go for you?
  • What, for you, were the benefits and drawbacks of portfolio work (as opposed to submitting a project, getting a grade, etc.)?
  • In what ways, if at all, did portfolio work make you think about writing (across media) differently?
  • If you had more time, what would you do differently for this submission?

7.) November 28: Map Wrap-Up

  • What are the affordances of maps as a genre? What does it do that other genres can’t?
  • What does gathering data, presenting it spatially, and creating/designing maps tell you about writing, literacy, and rhetoric, writ-large?
  • What suggestions do you have for improving or otherwise revising this unit? (Things you’d like to see, things you’d like to do, how better to support your learning, etc.)

Revision Questions for Blog Posts

Since your portfolio asks you to revise select blog posts (and in-class writing) for submission, and since I’m largely not providing direct feedback on these pieces of writing, I’ve posted some questions below that you can use to go back over your work. Use this in a peer review-style set-up, ask yourselves these critical questions, and/or reflect upon them in a way that will be conducive to your revision process:

Blog Post #1: GIF / Emoji Story

1.) Do you get a sense of what the author is trying to communicate with their story? If not, what concrete things could improve it?

2.) Where is the writer is especially taking advantage of what emojis / GIFs can do? Where are places where it seems like the writer isn’t taking advantage of what emojis / GIFs can do?

3.) Are there other suggestions for improvement—on a global scale—that would help the author better answer or address the prompt?

Blog Post #2: Composition / Rhetoric Reflection

1.) Does you get a clear sense of what the author understands composition to be from their blog post?

2.) Does you get a clear sense of what the author understands composition to be from their blog post?

3.) To what extent or degree of effectiveness does the author address the connections between composition and rhetoric? Do they discuss how they interact, contradict each other, revise, and/or extend each other, for instance?

4.) How effectively does the author cite from both Naming What We Know and “The Rhetorical Situation”? That is to say, does the author either quote or summarize both of these texts in a way that makes for complete and coherent analysis?

Blog Post #3: Found Graffiti Analysis

1.) Has the author adequately addressed the graffiti text’s message—what claim it’s making in the world as opposed to just a description of it?

2.) Does the author’s exploration of possible cultural / historical contexts with regard to their selected graffiti piece give you insight into the text that you wouldn’t have otherwise had?

3.) How effectively does the author consider the ways in which the location of the graffiti text adds to its meaning? To what extent does this help you understand the text better?

4.) Has the author described an audience for the graffiti text that goes beyond the obvious? Is the author imagining / describing an audience that’s specific (more than just “students” or “people who go to the Sipyard”)?

Blog Post #4: Graffiti Proposal

**No revision questions here! Proposals are ineligible for portfolio submission and revision, as stated in the mid-semester portfolio assignment sheet.

Blog Post #5: Remixing Composition

1.) How clear is the author’s distinction between mashup and reappropriation? Had you not read either of Sinnreich or Giacona’s posts, would you understand the difference? If not, what could make this portion of the blog post clearer?

2.) How effectively does the composer cite from the Sinnreich and Giacona pieces? In what ways does the author discuss these texts in a way that augments or otherwise amplifies their point?

3.) In what ways is how the author relates mashup and reappropriation to writing across media at large compelling or effective? As a student in this course, do you think the connections drawn here are strong? If not, how might the author be able to strengthen these ties?

Blog Post #6: Audio Manipulation Proposal

**No revision questions here! Proposals are ineligible for portfolio submission and revision, as stated in the mid-semester portfolio assignment sheet.

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